Copy of The Stanislavski Centre/Routledge Annual Lecture 2018

The Stanislavski Centre presents

The Stanislavski Centre/Routledge Annual Lecture 2018

@ The Rose Theatre, Rose Bruford College, Sidcup DA15 9DF.
Wednesday 30th May at 19.00

Konstantin Stanislavski and Nikolai Demidov: Dialogue on Creative Subconscious
Prof. Andrei Malaev-Babel

One of the first three teachers of the Stanislavski System, Nikolai Demidov (1884-1953) was the original editor of Stanislavsky’s seminal book An Actor’s Work (An Actor Prepares). He co-founded the Fourth Studio of the Moscow Art Theatre, and served as the founding director of the Moscow Art Theatre School. As Stanislavsky’s close collaborator for over 30 years, Demidov was a professionally trained psychiatrist, and a specialist in esoteric disciplines, including yoga. Since 1909, Demidov shared with Stanislavski the materials on modern and classical psychology, eastern esoteric traditions, Christian Orthodox Hesychasm, as well as his own groundbreaking writings and experiments in organic acting technique. Under Demidov’s influence, Stanislavski authored the final chapter of An Actor’s Work: The Subconscious and the Actor’s Creative State. Professor Malaev-Babel’s lecture concentrates on the history of a creative relationship between Stanislavski and Demidov, including their dialogue on the role of the subconscious in an actor’s process.

Andrei Malaev-Babel is the Head of Acting at the Florida State University/Asolo Conservatory for Actor Training. He served as the Producing Artistic Director for the Stanislavsky Theater Studio (STS), an award-winning company and conservatory in Washington, DC, where he was nominated for a Helen Hayes Award as an Outstanding Director. His one-man show, Babel: How It Was Done in Odessa, has been presented in the US and abroad, including the UN-produced presentation in Moscow. Mr. Malaev-Babel’s reputation as one of the leading experts on Russian theater and acting techniques, have brought him special engagements and commissions from institutions such as The World Bank, The Smithsonian Institution, Russian State Institute of Performing Arts (St. Petersburg), Stanford University, the Latin American Film Festival (Brazil), The Study Centre for Documentary Research into European Theatre and Opera (Italy), The Odessa Philharmonic (Ukraine), Young Vic Theatre, and The Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (UK). He is an author, editor and contributor to several books on the key figures of Russian theatre, such as Yevgeny Vakhtangov, Michael Chekhov and Nikolai Demidov. He serves on the board of the Michael Chekhov Association in NYC, and on the advisory board of Rose Bruford College’s Stanislavski Centre. Andrei Malaev-Babel is a graduate of the renowned Vakhtangov Theater Institute in Moscow, Russia. He trained and worked under Alexandra Remizova, co-founder of the Vakhtangov Theater, Stanislavsky’s student and Vakhtangov’s protégé.

This event is sponsored by Routledge/Taylor & Francis.

Online booking is now open.

Full Price (£7.00)
https://store.bruford.ac.uk/product-catalogue/research-centres/research-events/annual-lectures

Concessions (retired/unwaged/student) (£5.00)
https://store.bruford.ac.uk/product-catalogue/research-centres/research-events/the-stanislavski-centre

If you have any questions about this event, please contact paul.fryer@bruford.ac.uk

Research Projects

Staff at Rose Bruford are engaged in diverse practice research projects, covering an array of subjects and specialisms. These include the impact technology is having on scenography, theatre design, the relationship between space and memory, music in opera and theatre, solo performance, the history and legacy of Constantin Stanislavski and Tadeusz Kantor, the role of the director, and feminist aesthetics.

Further details can be found here.

The Performance of Directing: A Linked Series of Directing Workshops

Contemporary Directions workshops in the ongoing Rose Bruford and Stanislavski Centre Exploration of Directing and Director Training.

In association with Presence Theatre

Rose Bruford College of Theatre and Performance, Lamorbey Park, Sidcup

[25 mins. From London Charing Cross]

Fortnightly on Saturdays

April 29th, May 13th & 27th, June 10th & 24th 2017

10am – 4pm

Theatre Directing is an intense physical, verbal, cognitive, empathic, intuitive and strategic performance activity, largely improvised, and pursued in close reciprocal engagement often with the most receptive and sensitive of collaborators: performers and other fellow theatre-makers. Every interaction counts, every physical and mental resource is an instrument that can be productively used. This sometimes involves a concerted attempt to influence and directly shape the raw matter of others’ creative imagination and, paradoxically, sometimes it involves the very opposite. All in the constant director-led search for the most effective, insightful, distilled and lucid stage action

These day-long practical director-training-and-research workshops involve a ‘directing-in-dialogue’ approach and include working with professional actors from Presence Theatre. The workshops are led by two practitioners, Simon Usher (RSC; National Theatre; Royal Court) and Colin Ellwood [Rose Bruford, Central, Guildhall], with extensive combined experience in both directing and director training. The final summative workshop has been designed in consultation with and will feature the participation of playwright Simon Stephens

Taken together these workshops aim to offer comprehensive grammar of contemporary directing useful for both working and emerging directors and also for anyone with a serious interest in its constantly-developing practice

We begin in Workshop 1 (‘exposition’) by setting out the geographies of directing in relation to the terrains of performance, identifying for example what causes  audiences to ‘lean forward’ into the performance experience; then in Workshop 2 (‘inciting incident’) we focus on the director, her/his ‘performance’ in the room – physically and verbally –  and its direct effect on the developing production not just in terms of general atmosphere but also in relation to the detail and achieved-ness of individual moments of performance. Workshops 3 and Workshop 4 (‘development, complication, crises’) pull back from what might be termed ‘leading edge’ directing techniques to explore the facilitation of the performers’ imaginations in a broader ‘parameter’ directing mode – where  the ‘creative space’ made available to the performer is framed and grounded more broadly through Exercises and Improvisations. Finally, in Workshop 5 (‘resolution’) with the participation of  Simon Stephens we return again to the core ‘instrumentality’ of directing to the synthesise the earlier work in the quest for concerted, meaningful, spatially and temporally-shaped and compelling staged action. For this final day we will drawing principally on Simon’s Three Kingdoms, given a highly charged and radical production in 2012 at the Lyric Hammersmith directed by Sebastian Nübling

Participants will have a range of opportunities to participate in the directing of featured scenes and also to observe, discuss and evaluate demonstrated work in relation to a range of dramatic forms and texts. The central focus will be on contemporary theatre writing – both originally in English and in translation – and will also including engagement with the works of Shakespeare and Brecht.

Participant feedback from recent Contemporary Direction workshops (2016/17):

  • ‘Thanks so much, as in all good things, I was left wanting more. So engaging and informative and fun’: (Directing Through Exercises)
  • ‘Just a note to say how much I enjoyed and got from the directing workshop I attended. I’ve been returning to my own notes from the day again and again. It was so fab to be working on the subtlety of questions around form and the matter of the pieces, as well having a shared psychophysical vocab underpinning’. (Directing Through Form)  
  • ‘I do think these sessions are very valuable and interesting, and I very much enjoy attending them’(Directing Through Form  & Directing Through Exercises)
  • ‘I look forward to more workshops in 2017’ (Directing, Induction and the Unconscious)

Workshop 1: Gateways and Geographies

Saturday 29th April 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Intended as a useful introduction to the workshop sequence and lay down a common foundation for what follows, this session aims to establish the elements, resource, objectives and terrains of directing; to introduce a model of effective engagement with these; to identify and make sense of recent trends and debates; to consolidate awareness of the active ‘affective core’ of performance that directing aims to incubate and shape; and to fashion an agenda of questions and issues to be addressed in the forthcoming sequence.

Workshop 2: The Director in the Room

Saturday 13th May 10 a.m. – 4 p.m

Identifying and tuning the physical and verbal instruments and techniques of directing to optimize the positive effect of the director’s impulse and insight

How might a director most effectively ‘be’ in the room? What should be the relationship with actors and stage managers? How and in what forms might actors be
encouraged to receive direction most productively? What for that matter is ‘direction’? Where does it come from? What are the best and also the accepted boundaries between actor- and director- ‘jurisdiction’? How much are different actor ‘individual processes’ a factor? Exploring the most effective protocols for guiding rehearsals and shaping performances

Workshop 3: Directing through Exercises

Saturday 27th May 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Exploring in a practical setting a range of exercises and their use 

Joe Chaikin and the Living Theatre

Exercises, or what might technically be termed ‘non-situational protocol-based interventions’, are a vital performer-training tool and increasingly a primary element of any directing process. Their use can contribute to the development of skills, sensitivities and affordances within ensembles, while instigating and framing individual performer ‘primary-process ‘ creative material. Often used to keep work fresh and to encourage new perspectives, they offer a way for the director to guide and shape performances without dictating or (in any sense of the term) blocking. Their selection, adapting and sensitive deployment represents a key area of directing craft and many practitioners have their own repertoire, often endlessly adapted and sometimes closely-guarded.

Workshop 4: Directing through Improvisation

Saturday 10th June 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

The setting up and varied use of parallel-situation, situation-sequential and situation-enacting improvisations as both a foundational and a complementary rehearsal practice.

Enactment creates more and richer experiences that conceptualisation. Improvisations can be thought of as ‘situational exercises’, enacting ‘located’ encounters in order to intensify, release, enrich and contextualize the drama’s core scripted interactions. These can for example be linked to the play’s world/situation as enactments of character pasts/futures or, contextually, be of analogous situations closer perhaps to the performers’ own experience but drawing them towards the fully apprehending and imagining of the scripted encounters. Indeed in increasingly popular approaches based on Stanislavski’s late process ‘active analysis’ and encouraged by the contemporary drive towards a brutal surface reality of behavior, the drama’s key scripted encounters themselves can be realized as improvisations. This workshop explores the appropriate protocols, uses, possible outcomes, advantages and drawbacks of all these possible uses

Workshop 5: Story into Space – A Sense of Connection:  Three Kingdoms

Saturday 24th June 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Shaping the physical and dramaturgical score in the designed space.

The delineating and intensifying of the dramatic or performative action, and the shaping of performer impulse into distilled and lucid temporally-dynamic spatial existence within the designed physical environment, are arguably the two central tasks of directing. Might they be linked? If so then the copula is ‘story’. But what is story? Or rather what are the cognitively salient and effective elements of story in a contemporary context ? What ‘magnifies’ (in both senses of ‘enlarge’ and ‘make magnetic’) real-world fragmentary and diffuse action as a necessary part of its forging (again in two senses) for the stage? Might an answer here involve, paradoxically, not actions but the break between actions…..the action-galvanising, quantum-releasing, focus-centring ‘shift’ that occurs as a result of the serially-embedded ‘incoming unexpected’, Aristotle’s perennial  ‘revelation and reversal’, ‘broken action’. There is a tension here between long-evolved human cognition on the one hand and contemporary saturated social and cultural experience and theory on the other, at the centre of which sits the director and the theatre event. And behind the artifice of story lies the even more pervasive one of fiction – the etymology of which is simply ‘made thing’. In light of this and the experience of the earlier workshops we will explore awarenesses, principles and techniques involved in achieving the fluency, clarity and shape of the material performance within and across the frame. Our key text will be Simon Stephens’s Three Kingdoms, premiered in 2012 in a provocative and highly influential trans-national production at the Lyric Hammersmith directed by Sebastian Nübling. The play’s title also offers a powerful metaphor for some of our territories today. Serial Three kingdoms:

1: Action/Story/Space; 2: Actor/Director/Writer; 3: Performance/Drama/World; 4: Expressivity/Instrumentality/Storytelling; 5: Cause/Effect/Observer

Links to Three Kingdoms Video Material

Lyric Trailer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VpGsgU1XOp4

Interviews with Sean Holmes and Simon Stephens:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KlVAxsmFGwM

International material:

An Excellent Discussion of the Production:

http://postcardsgods.blogspot.co.uk/2012/05/three-kingdoms-lyric-hammersmith.html

Workshop Cost

  • Full price £75 per workshop / £300 for the full series of five
  • SCUDD Members £65 per workshop / £275 for the full series of five
  • Concessions £50 per workshop / £225 for the full series of five

To book

http://store.bruford.ac.uk/product-catalogue/short-courses-and-conferences/summer-school/the-performance-of-directing

For more information please contact colin.ellwood@bruford.ac.uk

Contemporary Directions is a Rose Bruford Stanislavski Centre research project and website drawing on the college’s extraordinary history of successful director training to explore, contextualize and celebrate the practice of contemporary theatre directing and directing training.

Presence Theatre was formed in 2007, and has since presented a number of performances and rehearsed readings and continues to hold workshops approaching different genres of drama from the actor’s and director’s perspective. As a registered charity that exists for the public benefit, Presence Theatre aims to involve the largest and most diverse audience that our resources will allow to help to advance the medium in every sphere: art, production, education and community.

Tutor Biographies

Simon Usher

Currently Joint Artistic Director of Presence Theatre, Simon has staged major productions for

the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Royal Court Theatre, the National Theatre, Chichester Festival Theatre and in London’s West End. He has been Artistic Director at the Bel
grade Theatre, Coventry and Associate Director of the Leicester Haymarket.  Further credits include The World’s Biggest DiamondHeronsMother Teresa is Dead and Black Milk (Royal Court), King Baby and Tamar’s Revenge (Royal Shakespeare Company), Sing Yer Heart Out for the Lads (National Theatre), Timon of AthensThe Broken HeartPericles and The Winter’s Tale (Leicester Haymarket), Pond LifeNot Fade AwayThe Mortal Ash and Card Boys (The Bush), Burning Everest and Exquisite Sister (West Yorkshire Playhouse), Mr Puntilla and His Man Matti and Holes in the Skin (Chichester Festival Theatre), Les Liaisons DangereusesWaiting for GodotHamlet and Whole Lotta Shakin’ (Coventry Belgrade), Great Balls of Fire (Cambridge Theatre, West End), No Man’s Land (English Touring Theatre) and The Wolves (Paines Plough).

 Colin Ellwood

Has taught and directed at most of the UK’s leading drama schools and was Programme Director for the Rose Bruford Directing BA, of which recent graduates include the three current youngest building–based Artistic Directors in the UK as well as multiplewinners of the Regional Theatre Young Director Scheme and of many other awards including recent/current winners of the Young Vic Genesis Futures Award [2016], the James Menzies Kitchen Young Director Award [2016]; Royal Court and Orange Tree Trainee Directorships and Associate Director appointments at the RSC, Lyric Hammersmith, Donmar, Edinburgh Lyceum and elsewhere, as well as of the Off-West-End Best Director and WhatsOnStage Best Production awards, and of several London Evening Standard Theatre Award nominations, an Edinburgh Fringe First and both a BAFTA and a Royal Television Society Award.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Directing Summer School

Rose Bruford College of Theatre and Performance and The Stanislavski Centre

Lamorbey Park, Sidcup

Monday 3rd – Fri 7th July

(10 am – evenings each day)

This week-long intensive directing exploration and training event offers a rare combination of linked tutor-led workshops (mornings), supervised participant directing practice with actors (afternoons) and discussions and video showings (evenings), leading to a showing and discussion of student-prepared work on the final afternoon

  • Master-classes each morning from a range of practitioners
  • Afternoon individual participant-directed scene rehearsals with professional actors and acting students
  • Final-day showing of work and debrief
  • Evening discussions and related video showings (optional)

Feedback from participants in previous CD training and research events (2016/17):

  • ‘Thanks so much, as in all good things, I was left wanting more. So engaging and informative and fun’
  • ‘Just a note to say how much I enjoyed and got from the directing workshop I attended. I’ve been returning to my own notes from the day again and again. It was so fab to be working on the subtlety of questions around form and the matter of the pieces, as well having a shared psychophysical vocab underpinning’.
  • ‘I do think these sessions are very valuable and interesting, and I very much enjoy attending them’.
  • ‘I look forward to more workshops in 2017’

The course is led by practitioners with extensive combined experience in a wide range of directing practices and trainings: Simon Usher (RSC; National Theatre; Royal Court), Colin Ellwood [Rose Bruford, Guildhall, Central] and Matthieu Bellon (Rose Bruford, Bred in the Bone and Song of the Goat). We will be joined for the final day by Ramin Gray (Artistic Director of Actors Touring Company and former Associate Director Royal Court) who will also participate in feedback on student work. The course is intended to establish (for both practitioners and scholars) a workable grammar of contemporary directing; a foundation in basic directing practice and a contribution to the consolidation of more advanced skills.

The course aims also to offer participants in earlier Contemporary Directions workshops such as The Performance of Directing sequence an opportunity to further develop their practice

Contemporary Directions is a Rose Bruford Stanislavski Centre research project and website drawing on the college’s extraordinary history of successful director training to explore, contextualize and celebrate the practice of contemporary theatre directing and directing training.

Cost

Deposit – £100

Course fee – £600

Early booking before 1 May 2017 – £500

Accommodation – £250

Key: EB = Early Bird Accomm = Accommodation

Online booking 

http://store.bruford.ac.uk/product-catalogue/short-courses-and-conferences/summer-school/contemporary-directions-summer-school

For more information contact

colin.ellwood@bruford.ac.uk

Tutor Biographies

Simon Usher

Currently Joint Artistic Director of Presence Theatre, Simon has staged major productions for the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Royal Court Theatre, the National Theatre, Chichester Festival Theatre and in London’s West End. He has been Artistic Director at the Belgrade Theatre, Coventry and Associate Director of the Leicester Haymarket. Further credits include The World’s Biggest Diamond, Herons, Mother Teresa is Dead and Black Milk (Royal Court), King Baby and Tamar’s Revenge (Royal Shakespeare Company), Sing Yer Heart Out for the Lads (National Theatre), Timon of Athens, The Broken Heart, Pericles and The Winter’s Tale (Leicester Haymarket), Pond Life, Not Fade Away, The Mortal Ash and Card Boys (The Bush), Burning Everest and Exquisite Sister (West Yorkshire Playhouse), Mr Puntilla and His Man Matti and Holes in the Skin (Chichester Festival Theatre), Les Liaisons Dangereuses, Waiting for Godot, Hamlet and Whole Lotta Shakin’ (Coventry Belgrade), Great Balls of Fire (Cambridge Theatre, West End), No Man’s Land (English Touring Theatre) and The Wolves (Paines Plough).

Colin Ellwood

Has taught and directed at most of the UK’s leading drama schools and was Programme Director for the Rose Bruford Directing BA, of which recent graduates include the three current youngest building–based Artistic Directors in the UK as well as multiple winners of the Regional Theatre Young Director Scheme and of many other awards including recent/current winners of the Young Vic Genesis Futures Award [2016], the James Menzies Kitchen Young Director Award [2016]; Royal Court and Orange Tree Trainee Directorships and Associate Director appointments at the RSC, Lyric Hammersmith, Donmar, Edinburgh Lyceum and elsewhere, as well as of the Off-West-End Best Director and WhatsOnStage Best Production awards, and of several London Evening Standard Theatre Award nominations, an Edinburgh Fringe First and both a BAFTA and a Royal Television Society Award.

Matthieu Leloup-Bellon

Is Senior Lecturer in Acting and Directing, notably at Rose Bruford College where he was Module Year Co-ordinator on the Directing BA (2007-2011) He is a former core member of award winning Song of the Goat Theatre Company from Poland (2002-2009), and Co-founder and Artistic Director of Bred In The Bone Theatre Company. He has performed internationally and given workshops and master-classes in continental Europe, Iceland, Indonesia and Brasil. He has developed his own approach to actor training based on the practice of “Emotion-Actions” with Bred In The Bone since 2009.

Friday Guest

Ramin Gray

Is the Artistic Director of Actors Touring Company. His current production, THE EVENTS, written by David Greig, won a Fringe First at Edinburgh last summer and transferred to the Young Vic in October. Earlier last year he directed THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST, a new operatic adaptation by Gerald Barry of Oscar Wilde’s classic play, for the Royal Opera House. In 1990 he won a place on the Regional Theatre Young Director Scheme. At London’s Gate Theatre, he directed the British premiere of Jon Fosse’s THE CHILD, as well as new plays by Paul Godfrey and Gregory Motton. From 2000-09 Ramin was at the Royal Court, latterly as Associate Director. In the Theatre Downstairs he directed the world premiere of Simon Stephens’ MOTORTOWN, Max Frisch’s THE ARSONISTS, Martin Crimp’s ADVICE TO IRAQI WOMEN, two plays by Marius von Mayenburg, THE UGLY ONE and THE STONE and OVER THERE by Mark Ravenhill, which transferred to the Schaubűhne in Berlin. Freelance theatre work in the UK includes for the Royal Shakespeare Company, as well as Alistair Beaton’s KING OF HEARTS, which he co-directed with Max Stafford-Clark for Hampstead Theatre and Out of Joint. Internationally he has directed two plays by Simon Stephens, the German language premiere of Simon Stephens’ HARPER REAGAN at the Salzburg Festival and ON THE SHORE OF THE WIDE WORLD at the Volkstheater Wien, where it won the Karl-Skraup Prize. Future plans include Mark Ravenhill’s SHOOT/GET TREASURE/REPEAT in Budapest, the Austrian premiere of Dennis Kelly’s ORPHANS at Schauspielhaus Wien and the British premiere of Simon Stephens’ THE TRIAL OF UBU. In 2009 Ramin directed Benjamin Britten’s DEATH IN VENICE at the Hamburg State Opera, conducted by Simone Young. The production then transferred to Theater an der Wien, conducted by Donald Runnicles. Ramin recently directed the European premiere of Brett Dean’s new adaptation of the Peter Carey novel, BLISS, which ran in September at the Hamburg State Opera.

Directing Through Exercises

How do directors use exercises effectively in the rehearsal process?

Exercises, or what might technically be termed ‘non-situational protocol based interventions’, are a vital performer-training tool and increasingly a primary element of any directing process. Their use can contribute to the development of skills, sensitivities and affordances within ensembles, while instigating and framing individual performer as a primary-process of creative material.

Often used to keep work fresh and to encourage new perspectives, they offer a way for the director to guide and shape performances without dictating or (in any sense of the term) blocking. Their selection, adapting and sensitive deployment represents a key area of directing craft and many practitioners have their own repertoire, often endlessly adapted and sometimes closely-guarded.

This day-long practical workshop, including the chance to work with professional actors, takes a ‘directing-in-dialogue’ approach led by two experienced practitioners – Joint Artistic Director Simon Usher (RSC; National Theatre; Royal Court) and Artistic Associate Colin Ellwood – with extensive combined experience in both directing and director training.

A film of the workshop can be found on the Encounters page.

Actuating the Potential: Directing’s Quantum Moment

Two new Contemporary Directions workshops in the ongoing Rose Bruford/Presence Theatre Exploration of Directing and Director Training:

Actuating the Potential: Directing’s Quantum Moment.

Following on from success of the Directing through Exercises workshop earlier this year, these two day-long practical director-training-and-research workshops [which can be experience separately or as a linked pair] will as before involve a ‘directing-in-dialogue’ approach, include work with professional actors from Presence Theatre, and will be led by two experienced practitioners – Simon Usher (RSC; National Theatre; Royal Court) and Colin Ellwood – with extensive combined experience in both directing and director training. As before, participants will have a range of opportunities to participate in the directing of featured scenes and also to observe, discuss and evaluate work in relation to a range of dramatic forms and texts, including contemporary work, Shakespeare and Brecht. As before, the workshops will be of value to emerging as well as established practitioners of all levels of experience, and also to anyone with a serious interested it the contemporary and historical practice of directing.

Workshop 1: ‘The Given’: Directing and Given Form

Saturday 10th December 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Any play is a unique and specific formal structure. The most visible and salient aspect of this is the text. It could be argued that the core substantive experience of most drama is in the enacting of what might be termed the ‘threshold or moment of articulation’, where silence yields to impulse in the realization of speech [and bodily engagement] as action: theatre’s ‘quantum’ moment. This workshop explores techniques and approaches through which the director can draw from the material and semiotic aspects of the text realized as the expression of the inductively-inflected, situationally-specific interior unconscious impulse itself.

Workshop 2: ‘The Found and the Allowed’: Directing, The Preconscious and Induction

Saturday 17th December 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Aside from the play text itself, the two ‘axes of resource’ contributing to the director’s process are: the pre-conscious interiority of the performer [and for that matter of he director her/himself] and inducted material from the ‘exterior world’. Different modes of performance draw on these two axes in varying degrees: Brecht advocates the prioritizing of the latter while Stanislavski, amongst others, offers a framework for incubating the former. Together with the ‘givens ‘ of the play, inducted material creates parameters framing what might be termed the ‘creative space’ within which the continual ‘present-tense’ unconscious of the performer must necessarily be stimulated and brought to bear. This workshops explores practical ways in which material from observation and research can be deployed, and in which the pre-conscious might be unlocked and brought to bear at all stages, and also the balance between these two ‘dimensions’

For more information contact: colin.ellwood@bruford.ac.uk

Participant comments on ‘Directing Through Exercises’

‘Thanks so much, as in all good things, I was left wanting more.So engaging and informative and fun’

Cost

£35 for individual workshops or £60 for both
Concessions £25/£40

Online booking is available now from the Bruford Store
Approximate Schedule for each day

10:00 – Practical beginnings [attendees will have the opportunity to participate in this practical work or to observe]

10:30 – Agenda: establishing terrains and posing key questions

10:45 – In relation to contemporary text

11:45 –Break

12:00 – In relation to Brecht and other ‘instrumental’ texts

1:00 – Lunch

1:45 – In relation to Shakespeare

3:00 – Participant ‘tag’ directing of any of the above or another text

3:45 – Summary

4:00 – End